Palm Beach High School

The "School on the Hill" in West Palm Beach, FL

Does any one remember the handicap man that yelled, "Miami Daily News Pay...per." outside of Morrison's Cafeteria in downtown West Palm Beach?

If I remember correctly, both legs were amputated and he sat on a platform selling newspapers.

What do you remember about him? Name? What happened to him?

What do you rememer about Morrison's Cafeteria?

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You are right! But I never heard the last "er". All I heard was "Miami Daily News Pape!" It was so fun to go to that cafeteria when I was young.
Oh boy, I remember him so well - he and his wife together sold papers in front of Morrison's on the east side of Olive between Clematis and Datura Streets. Never knew his name - don't know what happened to him. But I can hear his voice so clearly in my mind ... slowly, very slowly ... MY ... AMMMIE ... DAY ... LEE ... NEWS ... PAY ... PER. Sadly, I never bought one from him.

Morrison's was a great place for lunch when I worked downtown. Quick to get in and out with plenty of time left over to shop at Belks and Burdines, Penneys and Wards, and 3 "dime stores" too. Who could ask for more? Walgreen's was another favorite lunch spot; I loved their open-faced hot roast beef sandwiches. There was a great waittress there named Vi.
Sometimes he was outside Walgreen's, too. I saw him with his family once or twice, I think there were a couple of little girls. I don't recall his legs being amputated, though.
Morrison's Cafeteria had wonderful roast beef! And it was near Brubaker's, the music shop with little booths where we could go to play the latest 45s and decide whether we wanted to buy them. That was where I first heard Elvis Presley.
Another person I remember was a lady named Dory who was blind and used to ride the city bus with her German Shepherd. Or was the dog named Dory? Anyway, the lady was pleasant, something of a WPB fixture with her dog and white cane, and you didn't see any other helper dogs in those days. The Post published a couple of articles about this lady so that everyone knew who she was and why she was taking a dog on the bus.
Speaking of Walgreen's, there were enclosed wooden phone booths in the back where you could go and have a private conversation for a nickel while reading the initials of past users carved in the wood. In junior high, if two or three of us happened to be downtown on a Saturday, we'd call whatever friend was missing and let her know we were about to order a cherry coke at the lunch counter. That also cost 5 cents (if you ordered the small size, and who ever had 10 cents? especially after calling your friend).
I remember the lady with the dog. I used to take the city bus all the time, and I saw her on the bus all the time.

My mother would take me to Morrison's alot. I remember waiting in line along the wall to get to the food bar. Also, they had all black servers and bus boys. They would carry the tray of food to your table. It was often hard to find a table because it was crowded, but the servers could spot one across the room. The food was delicious, and I liked being able to see the food you were going to eat instead of ordering from a menu with pictures. I had to finish all the food I chose.

Downtown West Palm Beach during those years was THE place to shop. I also remember the Montgomery Wards sporting goods store. It was an out-parcel building across 1st street from the main store. It is now a parking lot, I think. I loved going into that store.

Pam Ketter Browning said:
Sometimes he was outside Walgreen's, too. I saw him with his family once or twice, I think there were a couple of little girls. I don't recall his legs being amputated, though.
Morrison's Cafeteria had wonderful roast beef! And it was near
Brubaker's, the music shop with little booths where we could go to play
the latest 45s and decide whether we wanted to buy them. That was where
I first heard Elvis Presley.
Another person I remember was a lady named Dory who was blind and used
to ride the city bus with her German Shepherd. Or was the dog named
Dory? Anyway, the lady was pleasant, something of a WPB fixture with
her dog and white cane, and you didn't see any other helper dogs in
those days. The Post published a couple of articles about this lady so
that everyone knew who she was and why she was taking a dog on the bus.
Speaking of Walgreen's, there were enclosed wooden phone booths in the
back where you could go and have a private conversation for a nickel
while reading the initials of past users carved in the wood. In junior
high, if two or three of us happened to be downtown on a Saturday, we'd
call whatever friend was missing and let her know we were about to
order a cherry coke at the lunch counter. That also cost 5 cents (if
you ordered the small size, and who ever had 10 cents? especially after
calling your friend).
I often cut through the Montgomery Wards on the way to the bus stop. I frequently rode the city bus from my home in Lake Park to downtown because that's where the library was (we had a small one in Riviera Beach but I was terrified of the librarian, Rachel Van Berkum, who glared over her glasses if you checked out too many Nancy Drews). Wards' tire store was where they kept the new bikes, and it was fun to wander through the ranks of red and blue bicycles dreaming which one I wanted. The tires smelled really good, too. When I finally got a bike, it was a used one, and I could then ride to the Riviera Beach library. I never got over my fear of Miss Van Berkum, though. She was the commandant of the Library Police, I just knew it. :-0
That's so funny, Pam. I wonder if the librarian ever knew that you were terrified of her. But speaking of Montgomery Wards, wasn't it just fascinating when the clerk would put your cash into one of those tubes, push a button, and then you could watch as the tube made its way to some unknown spot up above? A few minutes later, the tube came back down to the cashier with just the right amount of change. Well.... it was fascinating to me anyway!
The Three Sister's store had an entrance on Clematis St. You could, also, cut through the Three Sister's and come out between Clematis St. and 1st Street on Olive. I used to take that short cut just to absorb some of the airconditioning in the hot afternoon. I used to carry my books and notebook under my arm and propped against my hip on the side. Well, the books would stick out to the side, and I often hit things with the books, if I was not careful, in tight places. One day I was cutting through the Three Sister's store and snagged a pair of women's panties on my books. I didn't know they were there because they were so light, and I kept on walking. When I reached the other end of the store, there stood a lady giving me the "evil eye." She staired me down. I stopped. I looked at her very innocently and asked what was wrong. She very sternly pointed to the women's panties. I turned every shade of the rainbow. I quickly handed them to her and ran out of the store. She said something to me as I was running out, but I didn't hear what she said. I never cut through that store again.
Thumper .... Are you making that up? What a hilarious story!
He also shouted " BA-LUUUE Streak,,,Stock Market...Racing reeeesults.. I ate there quite often. Lived on Hibiscus St. Just a short walk away. It was always a big deal when the "head waiter"...(Willy of course)...got my tray and carried it to the table...He had a gold badge and the others were silver..He was thrilled with a dime tip...My phone number at that time was 8077..Morrisons was 8076...We constantly got calls from inebriated waiters calling in sick...
Pam Ketter Browning said:
Sometimes he was outside Walgreen's, too. I saw him with his family once or twice, I think there were a couple of little girls. I don't recall his legs being amputated, though.
Morrison's Cafeteria had wonderful roast beef! And it was near Brubaker's, the music shop with little booths where we could go to play the latest 45s and decide whether we wanted to buy them. That was where I first heard Elvis Presley.
Another person I remember was a lady named Dory who was blind and used to ride the city bus with her German Shepherd. Or was the dog named Dory? Anyway, the lady was pleasant, something of a WPB fixture with her dog and white cane, and you didn't see any other helper dogs in those days. The Post published a couple of articles about this lady so that everyone knew who she was and why she was taking a dog on the bus.
Speaking of Walgreen's, there were enclosed wooden phone booths in the back where you could go and have a private conversation for a nickel while reading the initials of past users carved in the wood. In junior high, if two or three of us happened to be downtown on a Saturday, we'd call whatever friend was missing and let her know we were about to order a cherry coke at the lunch counter. That also cost 5 cents (if you ordered the small size, and who ever had 10 cents? especially after calling your friend).
I used to cut through Three Sisters too, but I never snagged anything! Wonder what ever happened to them, anyway?

Lois, I loved Monkey (that's what they used to call it) Wards' pneumatic tubes too. Now they have a similar system at the drive-in teller's of my bank, but when you put money in the tube, they never send anything back.....I keep hoping, though.

As for Miss Van Berkum, I'm sure she loved terrifying us. It was POWER, probably all the power she ever had (no husband to bully, obviously; she was about a hundred years old and never married). I mean, how hard would it have been to smile once in a while at an 11-year-old girl and say "Hope you enjoy the books, dear"? That would have been so nice. Lesson I learned: smile a lot, you never know whose life you might cheer up that day. (Now signing off to go smile at terrified husband - )

George Reese said:
The Three Sister's store had an entrance on Clematis St. You could, also, cut through the Three Sister's and come out between Clematis St. and 1st Street on Olive. I used to take that short cut just to absorb some of the airconditioning in the hot afternoon. I used to carry my books and notebook under my arm and propped against my hip on the side. Well, the books would stick out to the side, and I often hit things with the books, if I was not careful, in tight places. One day I was cutting through the Three Sister's store and snagged a pair of women's panties on my books. I didn't know they were there because they were so light, and I kept on walking. When I reached the other end of the store, there stood a lady giving me the "evil eye." She staired me down. I stopped. I looked at her very innocently and asked what was wrong. She very sternly pointed to the women's panties. I turned every shade of the rainbow. I quickly handed them to her and ran out of the store. She said something to me as I was running out, but I didn't hear what she said. I never cut through that store again.
I remember the blind lady with the dog. He always squished himself way up under her feet - was never in anyone's way. Your mention of the bus stop reminded me of how scared we would be walking to the bus stop after seeing a horror movie at the Palms Theatre. That place had rats and roaches running all over our feet. It's a wonder we didn't have a typhoid epidemic at PBHS. And the majic shop was right next to the Palms. Later they built a Holiday Inn on that property and I had my wedding reception there. Did you ever stop at Russo's for a sub on the way downtown after a half day school - then take the sub to one of the dimestores, order a coke and eat your sub at the counter. I did. more than once.

Pam Ketter Browning said:
Sometimes he was outside Walgreen's, too. I saw him with his family once or twice, I think there were a couple of little girls. I don't recall his legs being amputated, though.
Morrison's Cafeteria had wonderful roast beef! And it was near Brubaker's, the music shop with little booths where we could go to play the latest 45s and decide whether we wanted to buy them. That was where I first heard Elvis Presley.
Another person I remember was a lady named Dory who was blind and used to ride the city bus with her German Shepherd. Or was the dog named Dory? Anyway, the lady was pleasant, something of a WPB fixture with her dog and white cane, and you didn't see any other helper dogs in those days. The Post published a couple of articles about this lady so that everyone knew who she was and why she was taking a dog on the bus.
Speaking of Walgreen's, there were enclosed wooden phone booths in the back where you could go and have a private conversation for a nickel while reading the initials of past users carved in the wood. In junior high, if two or three of us happened to be downtown on a Saturday, we'd call whatever friend was missing and let her know we were about to order a cherry coke at the lunch counter. That also cost 5 cents (if you ordered the small size, and who ever had 10 cents? especially after calling your friend).

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